blog · blogging · fitness · top ten

Top Ten January 2023 Posts, #ICYMI

This is list is striking for two things. So many of the posts are from years past! I also love how many are written by guests. If you’d like to join our community of occasional guest bloggers read this post.

The most popular post of January was Cate on still menstruating 

Catherine’s Yoga poses I simply can’t do, and what I do instead was 2nd.

The 3rd most read post was Tracy’s on the many shapes athletic bodies can take.

Pain and the Human Playground by Sam was 4th.

Keeping Fit While Healing from a Hysterectomy was our 5th most read post, from Marjorie.

I walk 20K steps a day… and I’m getting rid of my Fitbit by Michelle was 6th.

The 7th most read post was Catherine’s post about the need to ditch the word ‘obese.’

In the spirit of changing the way we talk, our 8th most read post was Sam saying we should stop talking about women athletes’ slut strands,

The 9th most read post was Sam on the different messages told by articles in women’s magazines and by their advertisers.

And timely for New Year’s was Kate’s guest post on resolutions, This Time I Mean It: New Year’s Resolutions, Self-Forgiveness, and Fitness.

White yellow and pink flowers by Emilie Dagg on Scopio

blog · blogging · fitness · ICYMI · top ten

Most Read Posts of 2022, Written in 2022, #ICYMI

Lots of our most read posts in 2022 were written in years past. Earlier today I posted a list of the most read posts. But I’m always curious about which posts written in 2022 were read the most. Here’s that list:

Is the soleus pushup the key to health? (Catherine)

Pain and the Human Playground (Sam)

No more ‘slut strands’? (Sam)

Style secrets for women over 50? (Catherine)

Not too late to start Yoga with Adriene’s January MOVE practice #YWA (Tracy)

Gracilis cramps: A new bad thing–yikes!!! (Sam)

What to do instead of extreme dieting to get into an old dress for 5 minutes on social media (Catherine)

Inclusive objectification anyone? (Tracy)

The Year of Tiny Pleasures (Diane)

Christine Sinclair and Women in Sport (Diane)

people walking on the street
Photo by Alina Kurson on Pexels.com

blog · blogging · fitness · ICYMI · top ten

Most Read Posts of 2022, #ICYMI

Our most read posts of the year, not necessarily written in 2022. The popularity of some early blog classics lives on.

The most popular post of the year was Cate was still menstruating (2018).

Keeping Fit While Healing from a Hysterectomy was our 2nd most read post, from Marjorie (2019).

The 3rd most read post in 2022 was Catherine’s post on soleus push ups.

Catherine’s Yoga poses I simply can’t do, and what I do instead was 4th.

The 5th most read post was Tracy’s on the many shapes athletic bodies can take.

Crotch shots, sports photography and the objectification of athletes bodies is an older blog post with words in the title that often get put into search engines. Sam’s nine year old post was our 6th most read post. (2013)

Sam’s mini review of Pain and the Human Playground was 7th.

Eighth was Nicole asking, My Metabolic Age is WHAT?? (2020).

Women, aging, and caring about your looks was the topic of the 9th most read post.

Sam wrote about slut strands and that was our 10th most read post in 2022. Enjoy!

Photo by
RODRIGO ESTEBAS
on
Scopio
blog · blogging · fitness · top ten

Top Ten December 2022 Posts, #ICYMI

Sam’s review of Pain and the Human playground was the most read post in December.

Cate and menstruation in her 50s. Her post about it almost always makes the top 10 list. This month it’s the 2nd most read post.

The 3rd most read post in December is Marjorie’s post about recovering from hysterectomy.

The 4th most read post was Sam’s saga about using her phone in the sauna.

Catherine’s post about the latest research on almonds and appetite was the 5th most read post.

Almonds spilling out of a jar on a rough wooden surface. Unsplash.

Every December Carly’s guest post makes the top ten as new year’s looms. This year not my resolution; thoughts on January weight loss from a cheerful chubster (guest post) was the 6th most read post.

There are yoga poses Catherine can’t do and her blog post about what she does instead is the 7th most read post this month.

The 8th most read post was Tracy’s older one on the many shapes athletic bodies can take.

Mostly we’re not new year’s resolution folks here at the blog but my post on some challenges we like is our 9th most read post.

Woohoo, bring on the light is number 10.

It’s the positive potato
blog · blogging · fitness · top ten

Top Ten November 2022 Posts, #ICYMI

  1. Is the soleus pushup the key to health? Catherine has thoughts
  2. Tracy’s older post about the many shapes athletes come in.
  3. Women Fighters of the Modern Middle Ages by Diane
  4. Cate and menstruation in her 50s. Her post about it almost always makes the top 10 list. This month it’s the 4th most read post.
  5. Marjorie’s older post on keeping fit while healing from hysterectomy.
  6. Pain and the human playground, a review by Sam
  7. Catherine’s helpful post about yoga poses she can’t do and what she does instead.
  8. Elan wrote about how to organize a chill, relaxed soccer team.
  9. How Catherine holds it togeher
  10. Sam’s post on aging, activity, and myths.
10!
blog · blogging · fitness · top ten

Top Ten September 2022 Posts, #ICYMI

First, it’s Cate and menstruation in her 50s. Her post about it almost always makes the top 10 list. This month it’s the most read post.

Second is a seasonal favorite. First published six years ago it almost always hits the top ten in September. That’s Scorn and Fetishization of Food: Gender Norms, Bacon (mmm… bacon), and Pumpkin Spice Lattes (like, yum!)

Remember my dear at midnight September 1st everything will turn into pumpkin spice

Third, it’s Marjorie’s older post on keeping fit while healing from hysterectomy.

Fourth is Sam’s post on checking in one week after knee replacement.

Fifth, Catherine looks at more misleading science and health reporting, these stories and her analysis look at balance and morality risk. Hot tip–the truth is more complicated that than the headlines make it appear.

This was also popular in September and I approve. Horns improve everything.

Sixth is Catherine’s helpful post about yoga poses she can’t do and what she does instead.

Seventh, Amanda-Lynn blogged about gender, work, and finding progress where we can. I think that especially in September that’s theme to which many of us relate.

Eighth, Sam’s post about what three weeks after knee replacement surgery looks like, including a photo of her knee without staples.

Ninth, Tracy’s older post about the many shapes athletes come in.

Tenth, Sam’s older post about women, aging, and the cost of caring about your looks.

blog · blogging · top ten

Top Ten August 2022 Posts, #ICYMI

This list of most read posts will be familiar by now. Lol.

First, it’s Cate and menstruation in her 50s. Her post about it almost always makes the top 10 list. This month it’s the most read post.

Second, Marjorie’s guest post on keeping fit while healing from hysterectomy.

But the rest were (mostly) written this month!

Third, Sam reported on feminists having conflicting thoughts about Nicole Kidman’s biceps.

Fourth, Nearly half of British women don’t exercise? The Internet has thoughts (Bettina)

Fifth, Sam is checking in for August with all sorts of Big News

Sixth, Catherine’s 2022 Stop-Doing List

Seventh, Elan covers 10 years and 4 themes of FIFI

Eighth, Catherine considers pointless fitness goals.

Ninth, Catherine tried the sit-rise test.

Tenth (from 2020 and still going strong), My Metabolic Age is WHAT?? (Nicole)

the year legit went like jaaaaaannnnnnuary, febuaaaaaaaarrrrrrryyyyyy, maaaaaaaaaaarchhhh, aprilmayjune, july, AUGUST.
blog · blogging

Happy 10th anniversary to us!

I never know exactly which day to count, the day of our first actual post, after writing our bios, or the day we got all set up on WordPress.

Today is the latter.

Happy Anniversary to Us!

For a lovely post that reviews that themes of the blog over the years and makes a case for why we’re still needed check out Elan’s post here.

No doubt I’ll have more to say later but I’m still recovering from yesterday’s total knee replacement. All going well so far.

birthday · blog · blogging · fitness · Throwback Thursday

10 Years and 4 Themes of FIFI

Though a long-time reader of FIFI, I joined as a regularly contributing author not long ago. It has been a joy for me to re-visit the FIFI blog on this date in its first year of publication and think about how events of the past 9 years confirm the need for FIFI long into the future.

A decade ago

The FIFI blog was launched at the end of August 2012. Almost a year later, the August 25, 2013 post invited readers to submit to a special issue of the International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics: See How She Runs: Feminists Rethink Fitness (Spring 2016).

Co-blog/issue editors Samantha Brennan and Tracy Issacs describe how the special issue—like the still-new blog from which it emerged—looks critically at the impact of fitness on women and “the very assumptions about what constitutes ‘fitness’ in the first place” (p. 3).

In forms of writing both scholarly and personal, the articles surface four key and connected themes related to fitness and feminism:

  • Equality – the gender disparity that starts in childhood and widens in adulthood,
  • Inclusivity – the exclusion of women and minorities from domains of sport and the lack of diversity in the fitness media,
  • Empowerment – competitive sports, body performance, and the linking of sports to personal confidence and public life, and
  • Aesthetics and feminine embodiment – the complex relationship between women, their fitness goals, and their bodies.

These themes have since featured prominently as the cardinal compass points guiding thousands of FIFI blog posts by more than 165 authors over the last 9 years.

Nearly a decade later

FIFI continues to examine and re-define fitness from an anti-homophobic, anti-racist, anti-ableist feminist lens. Over the last decade, this blog has helped readers to reflect on the many history-making moments in sports and fitness. Here are just a few:

Equality: Since 2013, wage and other gaps between men and women in sports (like basketball, surfing, and hockey) have been spotlighted. For instance, in 2017 the women’s hockey team announced a boycott of the world championship if U.S.A. Hockey did not increase the women’s wages. Despite greater attention to inequality, gender gap in sports participation, funding, and media attention still continues.

Inclusivity: Athletes have become more vocal about gender, race, and mental health in sports. For example, in the media gymnast Simone Biles confronted the myth of the strong black woman affecting women athletes of colour. Tennis player Naomi Osaka also articulated the need to address depression, burnout, and toxic spaces that athletes face. Yet, CAMH notes that stigma continues to be attached to mental illness as a sign of unfitness in sports.

As well, inclusivity and diversity in sports are subject to ever-changing rule books. Since 2013, some rules have shifted to promote greater inclusion, while others have not—such as the recent exclusion of transwomen athletes from sports such as rugby, swimming, and track and field.

Empowerment: Over the last few years, research has found that gentle exercise benefits women, especially at older ages. A greater focus on happiness and health, as well as recovery time, has also appeared in emerging fitness research. Social media movements addressing fat bias, such as #StrongNotSkinny, have helped to shift how women relate to athletic performance and body acceptance as a form of self-empowerment.

Aesthetics and feminine embodiment: And yet, also since 2013 more fitness influencers have greater…well, influence…than ever before on idealized body norms and commodified aesthetics. Gear such as fitness trackers have been lauded for helping women to be more fit. But their use may be concerning for reasons of data privacy and whether this tech actually matches women’s wellness and fitness goals in the first place.

A decade (or more) more

What has changed since the first year of FIFI is a more collaborative approach to publication. Under the continued leadership of Samantha, a larger collection of blog authors help to manage the blog while being a supportive global writing community for each other.

Our reading community is larger since 2013 too—tens of thousands of subscribers, readers, likers, commenters, and sharers from around the world. (We appreciate you all!!)

And yet, like the special issue the blog is a mosaic of diverse reflections that encourages making the world of fitness—and the many lived experiences of that world—more equal, inclusive, empowering, and embodied for everyone.

A decade goes by quickly, but this brief retrospective on key themes and tiny number of big fitness events show us the value of the FIFI blog then, now, and well into the future.

blog · blogging · fitness · ICYMI · top ten

Top Ten Posts in July, 2022 #ICYMI

At 53 1/2 Cate was still menstruating and her post about it is always on our top ten list. This month it’s #1!

Keeping fit while healing from hysterectomy, by Marjorie.

Catherine goes on a yoga retreat and still can’t do hero pose, despite everyone’s best efforts

Crap on the run by Nicole

Through A Different Lens: Seeing My Power Now by Christine

Christine

Women who care most about their looks have the toughest time aging by Sam, from 2014

Crotch shots and up-skirts, Sam’s post from years ago with the words in the title that keep search engines happy

Gracilis cramps: A new bad thing–yikes!!! by Sam

“Girls say they hate their vaginas.” WTF? by Tracy

Sam has thoughts about shorts

JULY grey on black Unsplash