family · fitness · holidays · kayak · kids and exercise

Catherine tows two boats with her kayak and learns more kayak lessons

What better place is there for a sunny and warm US Memorial Day holiday than the water? That’s just what I thought, so I went paddling with friends Deb and Tim and their teenagers Mari, Leah and Jacob (who actually just turned 20, but who I’ll refer to as teen for the purposes of this blog post), as well as their dog Ruby, who is turning 7 soon.

It was Tim’s birthday, so he planned a group paddle trip with the current down the Concord River in Massachusetts. We left cars at put-in and planned take-out spots, and then launched a) two inflatable tandem kayaks; b) one inflatable rowboat; and c) my sleek lightweight zippy carbon/kevlar 13′ kayak. Off we went.

There was paddling. There were hijinks. There were photo ops. There were snacks.

Ruby the dog liked to keep herself moving, preferably between boats. She moved nimbly, but sometimes resorted to swimming (with her doggie life vest). My narrow boat was a no-go. That didn’t stop her from trying, though.

About an hour or so into the trip, though, the teens began to tire. Admittedly, wrangling the inflatable kayaks is difficult– they simply aren’t made for speed or distance, and they’re difficult to steer, too. And the inflatable rowboat? Fugetaboutit.

I had an idea: I’d practiced towing another kayak in a Maine weekend course. But I didn’t have a tow line. Rats! Luckily, Tim came prepared with lots of rope. So we tied one kayak to the stern of mine, and I began paddling. Turns out it was way easier than I thought. Yay! And, it was much easier to paddle in a straight line while towing than not while towing. Great!

We tried rotating the kids into different boats to take breaks. Deb hosted her son Jacob, who was in turn hosting Ruby in one of the inflatables.

Deb paddling a yellow inflatable kayak, her son Jacob lying with his head in her lap, and Ruby keeping watch.

Then, about 30–40 minutes later, more teens got tired and our pace slowed to a crawl. The charm of the wildly careening inflatables was wearing off, and the kids just wanted to head down the river. No amount of snack application was working. Fair enough. So, Tim once again dug into his backpack of treasures and came up with more rope, this time tying the rowboat to the kayak (which was tied to my kayak). I restarted paddling.

This time it was harder, and I made very slow progress. But it was forward motion and it was sustainable over the next couple of hours. Check out the picture below for verifiation.

Me, towing an inflatable kayak and rowboat, with three teens and a dog.
Me, towing an inflatable kayak and rowboat, with three teens and a dog.

Tim and I decided it was best to take out at the next big landing. We arrived, and some of us stayed with the gear while others took an Uber to get the other car at the desired but un-reached take out spot. Hey, it happens, right? (Raise your hand or comment below if you’ve had this experience.)

We all made it home, considerably later and considerably hungrier than we expected, but none the worse for wear. It was a really fun time, with lots of laughs, some snacks, great weather, serious energy output, and some lessons learned. Here are my takeaways:

  • I can paddle for longer than I thought, even when it’s not as fun and I’m going slowly. This lesson may be applicable to other areas of my life, maybe…
  • I’m getting a tow line for my next trip– you wear it around your waist so you can attach and detach yourself from the line.
  • Slowing down the process of getting into my kayak worked very well. I kinda wish I had done the same with the getting-out process; I might’ve ended up less wet and smelly. Duly noted.
  • Bringing in-case gear, especially since it’ll fit in my boat’s rear hatch, is a good thing. I’ll be bringing extra rope and bungee cording, a knife, bug spray, headlamp, extra snacks, space blanket, an extra-extra bottle of water, and probably a few other things for all my kayak trips.
  • Every active trip I take– by land, sea or air– is going to be am opportunity for learning something new. Janet suggested I document my kayak outings with what happened, how it went, and what I learned. Imma do that.
  • I’ll bring a map next time. And the time after that. and so on.

Hey readers: any anecdotes about over- or under-shooting pickup or car locations during hikes, paddles, etc.? I bet you’ve got some good stories, which I’d love to hear about.

5 thoughts on “Catherine tows two boats with her kayak and learns more kayak lessons

    1. Whoa– I don’t even know how you’d set that up. Attaching trailer bike 2 to the seat post of trailer bike 1? Impressive. Glad you like the picture– the mom of the teens was photographing the whole thing.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Yeah, that’s what I did. Worked fine for commuting, though turns were pretty wide. On a steep hill it wasn’t pretty. We were on a quiet rural road and I had to yell “Pedal, kids!” Climbing out of the saddle is not a good idea. We made it and never tried that again.

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  1. Went on a river trip with a new coworker and his fraternity friends thinking it was probably a bad idea. They were in rented canoes and I was in my plastic touring kayak. They filled gallon jugs from a keg in the parking lot and I pretended I didn’t know them. It was a lovely day and my boat handled everything well including some rapids. I had a pump and it was was borrowed by many canoes. Our day ended when a girl passed out and the rangers patrolling the river sent our group back on the bus a few miles early.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Wow; sounds like the ranger was right. Glad you at least had your own little space of integrity… 🙂

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