Fit is a Feminist Issue, Link Round Up #81

This is where we share stuff we can’t share on our Facebook page for fear of being kicked out! Read why here. Usually the posts are about body image, sometimes there’s nudity but we’re all adults here. Right?

Poster that says "not one drop of my self worth depends on your acceptance of me" in black all caps on white poster with black border.

Image description: Poster that says “not one drop of my self worth depends on your acceptance of me” in black all caps on white poster with black border.

How to Love a Fat Person

Fat people are reminded every day that we are objects of fear and revulsion. When we dare to aspire to love — real, reciprocal, respectful, deep, boundless love — we are slapped back. Our most human want is met with a seemingly impenetrable wall of harsh stereotypes and unforgiving attitudes.

Fat people are expected to be grateful that anyone wants us — even if that desire shows up as sexual assault or abusive partners. We are subject to humiliation for daring to express our interest in someone else. Those who fall for fat people learn to hide their feelings after years of being told their desire isn’t real. We learn simple lessons: that bees sting, that fire burns, that open affection cannot be trusted, and that love is not for bodies like ours. If we are to be fat, we cannot also be loved.

I will be the flicker in your blind spot 

When I was a child in Tokyo, every evening my family and I would gather our toiletries and go down the street to the public bathhouse. There, in the women’s bath, all bodies slipped happily into the hot waters and gossiped and cackled. As a little girl I saw all the shapes and all the imperfections and all the stages of bodily change of wrinkles and sags and decay of time that framed the glorious granny grins of life well lived.

I told the women of this and their eyes lit up. (I need to get these women to an osento, or jimjillbang bath! Or saunas, or hammams or banyas…)

There were other threads of ‘all women’ assumptions.

Widow transforms herself

Show me a man who controls the way his wife looks, and I’ll show you a man with an unhappy wife.

For Charlotte Guttenberg, she had always wanted a tattoo. But her husband wouldn’t allow it. He has his mind made up as to “what a woman should look like” and because Charlotte wanted to be a good wife, she obeyed him.

“I always wanted tattoos. My husband…forbade me from having tattoos. His whole concept was that no lady would have a tattoo. But it didn’t stop me wanting one,” said Charlotte.

But when Charlotte’s husband died 10 years ago, she knew exactly what she wanted to do.

37 Beautiful Portraits Of Fat Couples Challenge Sizeism (NSFW)

“As author Junot Diaz once wrote, if you want to make a human being into a monster, deny them, at the cultural level, any reflection of themselves,” photographer Substantia Jones explains.

This adage strikes at the core of Jones’ mission as a fat activist and photographer. Eight years ago, she resolved to “subvert the very tool most often used to instill body hate” — photography — and wield it to celebrate fat bodies. (She prefers the term “fat” — a “morally neutral descriptor” — to the term “plus-size,” which she sees as more suited to clothing than people.)

Substantia was weary of sizeist representations of larger bodies in the media and the lack of images that depicted fat people as sensual, fulfilled beings. So, she started “The Adipositivity Project,” a photo-activism campaign dedicated to beautiful (and unretouched) photography of fat people of all sexualities, ethnicities, genders, and abilities.

 

Fit is a Feminist Issue, Link Round Up #80

This is where we share stuff we can’t share on our Facebook page for fear of being kicked out! Read why here. Usually the posts are about body image, sometimes there’s nudity but we’re all adults here. Right?

This Woman Took A Picture Wearing Just Tights To Make A Powerful Statement About Body Image

Same girl, same day, same time. 💛 Not a before and after. Not a weight loss transformation. Not a diet company promotion. 💛 I am comfortable with my body in both. Neither is more or less worthy. Neither makes me more or less of a human being. Neither invites degrading comments and neither invites sleezy words. 💛 We are so blinded to what a real unposed body looks like and blinded to what beauty is that people would find me less attractive within a 5 second pose switch! How insanely ridiculous is that!? 💛 I love taking these, it helps my mind so much with body dysmorphia and helps me rationalise my negative thoughts. 💛 Don't compare, just live for you. There is no one on this planet who's like you and that's pretty damn amazing don't ya think. The world doesn't need another copy, it needs you. 💛 We are worthy, valid and powerful beyond measure 💙🌟 (If you don't pull your tights up as high as possible are you really human?)

A post shared by Milly Smith 💛🌻☀️👑 (@selfloveclubb) on

It’s amazing how much something as seemingly innocent as a pair of tights can make you feel like total crap about your body—and one woman is laying it all out on Instagram.

Body positive activist Milly Smith, who operates under the Insta handle @selfloveclubb, posted side-by-side photos of herself in a pair of black tights, noting that they look like they’re being worn by different people. In the first pic, Milly’s tights are up high on her hips, creating a slim waist; in the second, her tights are low, creating a tummy.

Windsor group goes analog to improve perceptions of body image

A Windsor eating disorder association has launched a project that aims to improve perceptions of body image by encouraging people to take selfies with a Polaroid camera.

The Bulimia Anorexia Nervosa Association set up shop at the University of Windsor this week, asking students to take photos without giving them the ability to edit or enhance the images

The Be Your Selfie project is a departure from the easily altered images people share on social media, which are easily modified to change someone’s appearance.

“It’s in the moment,” said Zara Ali, who snapped a selfie with the Polaroid. “It’s your everyday kind of life, whereas, if you’re posting something on Instagram, you are going to look at it for the longest time ever.”

This Body-Positive Photo Series of Women Embracing Their Curves Is Mesmerizing

<p>Photo: Silvana Denker Fotografie </p>

Photographer and plus-size model Silvana Denker is back with a new body-positive series.

Following her “Body Love” campaign, in which she photographed eight women of all shapes and shades posing in just black undergarments, Denker released a new photo series titled “Metallic Curves.”

The series features nude women covered from head to toe in gold and silver body paint, posing for portraits against a black background — a powerful statement to embrace your body as it is. One of the women in the photoshoot was Denker’s 52-year-old mother.

White Women: This Is Why Your Critiques Of Beyoncé Are Racist

Pushing that bull-shittery aside, instead of being happy for Beyoncé and her Beybies, I came across three different think pieces about the announcement by salty white women who decided it was ok to criticize:

  1. The way she announced her pregnancy.
  2. The fact that she did announce her pregnancy.
  3. That she looked amazing in her pregnancy photoshoot.

Fit is a Feminist Issue, Link Round Up #79

This is where we share stuff we can’t share on our Facebook page for fear of being kicked out! Read why here. Usually the posts are about body image, sometimes there’s nudity but we’re all adults here. Right?

NSFW-Feminist Ex Mormon Brings Floral Vagina Paintings to Utah

Vulvas emblazoned with cherry blossoms, roses, butterflies, and irises take their place as wonders of the natural world in Salt Lake City artist Jacqueline Secor‘s expressive mixed-media paintings. Her statement is political, as far as womens’ bodies are battlegrounds, and the series has earned both praise and controversy in her local community.

Secor explains the context of The Diversity of Nature with a manifesto: “Women’s bodies have been blamed for inciting sexual violence that is enacted against them. Breastfeeding has been deemed ‘indecent.’ Birth control has been regulated by politicians that have never menstruated. Laws, religious texts, and social norms attempt to regulate women’s bodies. From the time a little girl is told she’s cute, to the first time that she’s called ‘sexy,’ the message is the same… her worth comes from her appearance. There is nothing wrong with celebrating feminine beauty, but it’s problematic when beauty is the only feminine value worth celebrating.”

Why Men Have More Body Image Issues Than Ever

Superheroes today are a lot more shredded than they used to be. The original Superman and Batman look almost willowy compared to our muscle-bursting modern-day versions.

That’s no coincidence. America is in the midst of a cultural shift in terms of the ideal male body image, and as the ideal man grows more muscular, men stuck in the real world with real bodies are growing less satisfied with theirs—with potentially dangerous medical consequences.

Body Image Concerns Linked to Alcohol Use in Teen Girls

Adolescent girls with a distorted body image are more likely to consume alcohol, according to a study published in the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs. Teen girls who try to alter their weight when there is no medical need to do so, the study found, are also more likely to engage in heavy drinking—defined as five or more drinks in a few hours.

Body image issues are often rampant among teen and preteen girls. A 2012 report by the Keep It Real campaign found 80% of 10-year-olds have been on a diet. The 2013 Girls’ Attitude Survey found more than half of girls age 14 and older are dissatisfied with their appearance.

You Should Be Getting Naked Around Strangers As Much As Possible, Science Says

Stripping off your clothes in front of someone, whether in the confines of a locker room or your very own bedroom, can be extremely terrifying. But as it turns out, getting naked around strangers may actually make you feel better about your body. According to DailyMail.com, a circle of researchers from Goldsmiths, University of London took a deep dive into the nudist lifestyle and found that taking a page from their book could be beneficial to your body image and overall happiness.

Watch video here.

Read more: http://elitedaily.com/dating/naked-around-strangers-body-image/1767403/

Fit is a Feminist Issue, Link Round Up #78

This is where we share stuff we can’t share on our Facebook page for fear of being kicked out! Read why here. Usually the posts are about body image, sometimes there’s nudity but we’re all adults here. Right?

Dancers destroying stereotypes

Akira Armstrong was in two Beyoncé videos, but couldn’t find an agent to represent her as a professional dancer because of her size. To change the narrative around what a dancer’s body should look like, Akira started her own dance company, made up of plus-size dancers. “Pretty Big Movement” is destroying dancer stereotypes, one routine at a time.

 

‘I Weigh 236 Pounds And I Have Great Self-Esteem’

Hi. My name is Sarah. I weigh 236 pounds and I have great self-esteem.

I attended my first Weight Watchers meeting in 1989. My mother is a lifetime member and she enrolled me in the kids’ program. She told me that life would be harder for me if I was overweight. She also said that I would be much happier if I could shop at “regular” clothing stores.

I locked myself in the bathroom and stood on the tub so I could see my legs in the mirror. I hated my thighs. I was nine years old.

Illustrator Explores Femininity Through Modern Cave Paintings

If cave paintings were able to kaleidoscopically cartwheel through a contemporary femme lens, the results would probably end up looking like Louise Reimer’s illustrations. The Canadian artist—who says her work explores femininity, interdependence, performance, and solitude—draws a world that is pink, mystical and brashly feminist.

“I never said to myself ‘I’m going to make feminist art,’ but my work is about girls and women and bodies and freedom, which are all connected to feminism,” Reimer tells The Creators Project. “The world my figures exist in is a kind of female utopia of safety, free from the male gaze, which I think is a feminist paradise.”

Why This Mom Is Sharing Pictures Of Her Body After Breast Cancer Surgery

Jennifer, a mother of two and breast cancer survivor, came across photographer Natalie McCain’s The Honest Body Project, and wanted to participate. The project, which showcases intimate portraits of mothers’ bodies alongside narratives about their lives, aims to empower mothers to feel good about their bodies and help instill body confidence in their children. Jennifer wanted to represent a specific group of moms — those who are battling, or have survived, breast cancer.

 

How the Fuck-Off Fairy helped me fight fat-shaming

“Recently, a personal trainer has been trying to recruit me as a client. When we first met, I told her my goal was to do a pull-up. I’ve been taking some aerial classes, but had plateaued, so decided to lift for a while and build some strength before going back. I told her what I’d been doing, and she was supportive. She made minor noises about how “slimming down” might help me lift my body weight easier. I understand physics well enough to know she is right, and mostly ignored the fat-shaming that was also present in the conversation.”

TOP 5 THINGS TO DO INSTEAD OF LOSE WEIGHT IN 2017

“As you may or may not have seen on the internet, I posed for the brilliant Tanja Tiziana for NOW Magazine’s 3rd annual Love Your Body Issue. This is the much anticipated January issue featuring ten Torontonians who bare all in front of the camera; each one with a beautiful story behind the love of their own bodies. I could tell you that it was easy. I could tell you that thanks to my innate confidence, I got buck and savoured every minute. But that would be a lie.”

Fit is a Feminist Issue, Link Round Up #77

This is where we share stuff we can’t share on Facebook page for fear of being kicked out! Read why here. Usually the posts are about body image, sometimes there’s nudity but we’re all adults here. Right?

How a feminist found body positivity at an art museum

Last week I had a lovely visit to the Worcester Art Museum (What a FABULOUS cultural gem hidden in the mid-sized city of Worcester, MA. GO VISIT!!) They have a wide range of art from Pre-Colombian statues from Peru to Modern 20th century art. While I was there, I was struck by the often body positive, diverse representation of the female body in many of the pieces of art. I wrote this letter to those painted, sculpted figures who made a difference in this feminist’s life.

THIS BODY-POSITIVE COSPLAYER’S CONFIDENCE IS CONTAGIOUS

“I was always a ‘pretty, but’,” says Rhapsody Artajo, who, by her own definition, is a woman of many trades: plus-size model, entertainer, singer, artist and makeup artist. “‘Oh, you’re pretty, but… you could stand to lose some weight. You’re talented, but…you should drop some pounds.’” Good thing Artajo hasn’t bothered to listen to the haters. She’s cosplayed as many recognizable characters of all sizes, including Rey from Star Wars: The Force Awakens, Katana from Suicide Squad and Ursula from The Little Mermaid.

Acacia Christensen, also known as Doughnut Messaround, wrestler, League Of lady Wrestlers

People say to me, “You’re so confident.” But there are good days and bad days. Usually it’s “This is me and I can’t do anything to change it, so I’m gonna have to enjoy it.” And then there are days when I’m like, “This is awesome – I’m fat and tattooed!”

All of my tattoos are kind of stupid and silly. [A sampling: “JUNK FOOD” on her knuckles, a T. Rex dressed up like Marc Bolan, and portraits of Weird Al Yankovic and John Waters.] One day I’m going to wake up and be like, “Well, that sure was a decision you made!” But I would rather have ones that are funny as opposed to ones that start out really meaningful and then you stop caring about them.

The biggest compliment I ever got came from John Waters while he was doing a talk here. He came over, gestured at me and was like, “This is everything. You look like you belong in one of my movies.”

When I’m wrestling, that’s a good [self-esteem] day. I look the least conventionally attractive when I wrestle, but I’m like, “This fits. I’m dressed like a cartoon character and nobody can say anything about it.

Humans of New York

Image may contain: one or more people and phone

“Last year I started figure modeling for art classes. I’m plus-sized, so I was a little worried about being nude. I was nervous about everyone seeing my stomach, and my thighs, and all my fat. But apparently my curves are fun to draw. In the classroom, all the features I saw as negative were viewed as assets. One student told me that it’s no fun to draw straight lines. It’s been liberating for me. I’ve always been insecure about my belly. But now my belly has been part of so many beautiful pieces of art.”

Cosplay Has Tried To Make Me, a Fat, Black Woman, Invisible

“Our bodies don’t need to be tamed. They can be loved, cherished, and appreciated regardless of how they look or what they are capable of doing… including when they’re dressed in a cosplay costume.”

Fit is a Feminist Issue, Link Round Up #76

This is where we share stuff we can’t share on Facebook page for fear of being kicked out! Read why here. Usually the posts are about body image, sometimes there’s nudity but we’re all adults here. Right?

Ways to be body positive in 2017

Let’s face it: 2016 was a shitshow. While we all try to be positive for 2017, the looming inauguration is scary as hell. That’s why it is especially important that we all band together to be strong for ourselves and each another.

In a time of global warming, war, humanitarian crises and other disasters, one thing is certain: body-shaming is one of the pettiest things in existence, yet it is incredibly prevalent today. It’s time to stop shaming ourselves and others. It’s time to band together.

What 8 body positive activists want you to know about losing weight in the new year

With a new year comes the all-too-familiar pressure to lose weight.

As the ball drops at midnight, the diet industry gears up to welcome women who mark Jan. 1 as the day they will begin restricting and training their bodies into the slim ideal. It’s all a part of the “New Year, New You” mantra we have been taught to value as gospel.

While the pressure to shrink your body is a constant for women year-round, the value of thinness is especially emphasized when New Year’s resolutions are thrown into the mix. It’s a time of year when hating yourself is made easy, packaged and sold by the diet industry as flaws in need of fixing. Many of us buy into it — but we don’t have to.

Simone Biles shares message on body image

Simone Biles let the body-shamers know how she feels about them.

On Tuesday evening, Biles tweeted out a powerful message about her body, saying “you can judge my body all you want, but at the end of the day it’s MY body. I love it & I’m comfortable in my skin <3.

Body image problems in teen girls tied to alcohol use

High school girls who have issues with body image and weight are more likely to be drinkers than ) their peers, a recent U.S. study suggests.

Researchers focused on body image behavioral misperceptions (BIBM) – when girls try to gain or lose weight to change how they look even though there’s no medical need for them to alter their weight.

In the study of more than 6,500 teen girls, 38 percent had these misperceptions and roughly two-thirds had tried alcohol at least once.

When teen girls had body image issues that drove them to try to change their weight, they were 29 percent more likely to have tried alcohol and 22 percent more likely to be heavy drinkers than young women without these body image problems, the study found.

Sexy, sassy, and over 50 

Sometimes, to be a woman over 50 is to feel invisible. It’s walking into a bar or restaurant and no longer being on the receiving end of an admiring glance. It’s feeling like people on the street are looking past you, as if you aren’t even there. Ask a middle-aged woman, and she might say these slights have whittled away at her self-confidence, tricking her into believing the best years are behind her.

We live in a culture that often equates beauty and energy with youth. But we’d like to turn that way of thinking on its head. We believe women can be smart and sassy, beautiful and confident ― and that they can continue to shake things up in the world around them ― whether they’re 50 or 75 or 100.

With that idea in mind, Huff/Post50 photographed 11 very sexy women between the ages of 48 and 67. A few are cancer survivors. A few are grandmothers. A few are single and a few are married. But what they all have in common is that not one is a shrinking violet. They feel better about themselves today than they ever have. We asked each woman to wear whatever makes them feel sexy, and to talk about what being sexy means to them now compared to when they were, say, 21. The resulting photos are stunning ― and entirely un-retouched.

Why plus sized isn’t inclusive

So plus size models. I don’t appreciate them as much as I really could and should. Please keep in mind that I’m not trying to hate on them. I love representation and it matters. And plus size models are, by all means, a great endeavour in an originally unbreakable line of work which is the modelling industry. But I don’t think plus size models are really representing women too well.

Fit is a Feminist Issue, Link Round Up #74

This is where we share stuff we can’t share on Facebook page for fear of being kicked out! Read why here. Usually the posts are about body image, sometimes there’s nudity but we’re all adults here. Right?

25 Women Of Color Who Paved The Way for Body Positivity & Plus Size Fashion

If you haven’t rolled your eyes at a mainstream news outlets’ list of body positive icons, then consider yourself lucky that you missed the frustration of seeing one of these stories come across your feed. Every few weeks it seems like another one pops up and not only are the majority of these icons above a size 8, but these lists usually include just one woman of color or sometimes none at all. I am so in favor of drawing attention to women who are challenging beauty standards but not if that list features women who all look the same.

It all begs the question: is a list like that actually challenging beauty standards or is it simply continuing to reinforce them?

In the press, the body positive conversation is being dominated by smaller white voices. Why does Amy Schumer saying she’s not plus size get covered by almost every news outlet while most remained silent on Gabby Sidibe’s sex scene on national TV? And when only certain bodies and voices are celebrated, this does a huge disservice to the community of individuals who worked so hard to get us here.

We need to talk about ‘fatcalling’ – not just catcalling

I have been catcalled exactly once. It was late at night, I was alone and waiting for my Uber outside the gates of LA’s Griffith Observatory, and I was already on edge. A group of guys drove past and shouted “cuanto?” at me, meaning ‘how much?’ in Spanish. I do actually speak some Spanish, but it was my first time dealing with ‘traditional’ catcalling, and I wasn’t thinking clearly. I couldn’t leave, but thankfully they did.

By contrast, I have been ‘fatcalled’ several times. ‘Fatcalling’ is a term I came up with to describe the abuse fat people, typically women, have hurled at them on the street. In my experience, the mainstream feminist narrative surrounding catcalling doesn’t allow much room for experiences like mine. Instances where I haven’t been objectified because the harasser considers me physically attractive, but instead where I’ve been denigrated because the harasser has decided I am not. Instead of “hey sexy”, I usually get “hey Jabba” (as in Jabba the Hutt, who is the boss of everyone so thanks for saying I’m powerful!!!) or “you’re a whale/hippo”, both of which are extremely cute animals that could crush a human being if they wanted to.

7 Phrases You May Not Think Are Fat Shaming – But Definitely Are

You’re not fat! You’re beautiful!’

This statement is incredibly problematic because it reinforces the idea that fatness and beauty are mutually exclusive.

Fat and beauty intersect, y’all. People are fat and beautiful. End of sentence.

Plus-size isn’t just about a “sense of belonging”: It’s also about knowing where you can buy some fucking clothes.

There have been some pretty questionable trends in plus-size fashion, and I’m not talking about yet another season full of “cold-shoulder” blouses.

Rather, I mean the trends behind the clothes — flower names instead of sizes, and models who want to be paid to for wearing plus-size clothes (but don’t want to be called “plus-size”), for instance.

I’m also talking about the way these conversations distract us from the real issues.