body image · link round up

Fit is a Feminist Issue, Link Round Up #10

This is where we share stuff we can’t share on Facebook page for fear of being kicked out! Read why here. Usually the posts are about body image. Why? Because those are the posts that usually have bare body bits in the image attached to them. This first one is a perfect example.

New York Women Draw Their Own Boobs

Nora Ephron didn’t just feel bad about her neck. She called breasts, or her lack of them, “the hang-up of my life.” In a 1972 Esquire essay, she wrote, “If I had had them, I would have been a completely different person. I honestly believe that.”

To find out how women see their own breasts, the Cut polled 57 New York women, ages 17 to 72 (plus one 4-year-old who grabbed the marker from her mom) and asked them to draw their boobs and write one sentence explaining how they feel about them. In cafés and bars, on playground benches and on the way to work, women laughed when they heard the question, disparaged their drawing abilities, and gave it a shot.

Toplessness, the Victorian taboo that won’t go away

French perception of what was acceptable for women was always different from British. In this our near neighbour provides a useful contrasting view and always has done. While Oliver Cromwell buttoned up every aspect of British society from the celebration of Christmas to the celebration of female flesh, there was a sigh of relief in England when Charles II returned to the throne in 1661 and brought with him a liberal attitude to female behaviour from the French court.Necklines across the country quickly plummeted so far that lady’s dressing table sets of the day might include pots of carnelian nipple make-up. Nell Gwyn, the king’s mistress, was painted nude and even Frances Teresa Stuart (the court’s It Girl) was painted with a top so low that her nipples are clearly visible. This fashion trickled down to common women (also portrayed in portraits of the day – often in landscapes) though the royal court with its taste for high fashion was the most extreme version of it. It’s interesting to note that in contrast to today, the sight of an ankle was considered vastly more shocking than the sight of a female breast.
So when did our culture change – when did the Puritan breast-haters have their way? Like many 20th and 21st Century taboos, we need to look to the Victorian era when the Queen’s innate prudishness tightened restrictions on women as surely as bone corsets stopped them taking in a deep breath.

Shimmy your way to body love

Belly dancers are more satisfied with their bodies and have better body image than young women who don’t belly dance, new Flinders University research shows.
In a survey of more than 200 Adelaide women, the belly dancers scored higher marks for positive body image and lower on measures of body dissatisfaction and self-objectification than a group of university students who had never belly danced.

Move over, Barbie. Realistic doll Lammily is on her way ..

And you can see the differences when you watch Lammily get morphed into a typical fashion doll. http://lammily.com

Also, Guess What? Kids Really Like Lammily, the Realistically Proportioned Doll

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